Richard Jeffery

What course did you study?

3D Animation course (10 weeks)

How did studying at Escape Studios help you into the world of VFX?

Specifically doing the animation course helped fast track my Maya skillset to allow me to apply for a greater variation of jobs. I now regularly work in both 2D and 3D allowing me to be more versatile.

What are you working on at the moment?

Currently working at FluxMedia in New Zealand and just finished a feature film project ‘25th April’.

What's your favourite movie and why?

Anything from Hayao Miyazaki. The Jungle Book, The Iron Giant, The Incredibles, Ratatouille and I love the look of the new Peanuts film. And let’s not forget Samurai Jack!

What lessons have you learnt during your time studying and your time working in VFX?

Never rest on your laurels. The industry is forever evolving and it pays to keep up.

If you had to sum up your time at Escape Studios in one word, what would it be and why?

Rewarding! I chose this word because I’d had an interest in learning Maya for a long time and finally made the jump into study. I applied myself, worked hard and at the end had a showreel that I felt reflected the quality of work I had set out to achieve. I also felt I had a solid understanding of animation techniques within Maya that would enable me to work efficiently in a studio environment. In all I was pleased to have undertaken the course and got everything out of it that I wanted.

What is your advice for those considering entering the industry?

Go to school! In my day, animation was an easier industry to start in. You didn’t need a degree (there wasn’t even one for animation back then). You just had to draw well and have a natural flare. The industry would teach you the rest. But it’s not like that nowadays. It has become so technology based and so varied in all its disciplines that you need to be highly proficient in many software packages. You should also have a solid art foundation. Being able to draw well and have strong artistic abilities will set you up for a great career. It’s a highly competitive industry so you need to be the best you can. You could argue that it depends on what area of animation you want to get into, but generally speaking you will need to be a mix of artist and tech geek. The balance of which is different for everyone. 

Keep updated with Richard's latest work.

Take a look at our BA/MArt The Art of Computer Animation undergraduate degree course or our range of short courses.

Specifically doing the animation course helped fast track my Maya skillset to allow me to apply for a greater variation of jobs.

Richard Jeffery