Adam Esat

What course did you study at Escape Studios?

Games

How did studying at Escape Studios help you into the world of VFX?

After Escape's Course finished, I had a great start to my portfolio and was feeling very confident about continuing to work on it. The confidence was important, as well as having decent knowledge on what is required of a junior artist in the games industry.

What are you working on at the moment?

LEGO Dimensions will be out next week, and I'm currently working on LEGO Avengers. Outside of that I try to get as much art work done as I can. I'm pursuing a more focused Character role in both 2D and 3D.

What’s your favourite game and why?

Pokemon Gold/Silver/Crystal. A very tough choice, as I had to pick between that, Metal Gear Solid, Zelda - Ocarina of Time and Super Mario World. But I would say Pokemon GSC has been most responsible for shaping who I am today in terms of Art and Career.

If you had to sum up your time at Escape Studios in one word what would it be and why?

Efficient. The Games Course was only 12 weeks. I can say that I managed to learn more in the first 2 weeks of the course than my entire 3 years doing a "Games course" at Uni. That's because the course was extremely focused and everything taught was incredibly relevant to what a student might want out of a games art course.

How did studying at Escape Studios help you into the world of VFX?

After Escape's Course finished, I had a great start to my portfolio and was feeling very confident about continuing to work on it. The confidence was important, as well as having decent knowledge on what is required of a junior artist in the games industry.

What lessons have you learnt during your time studying and your time working in VFX?

Studying at Escape, I would say patience is a very important thing to have as an artist, and I still get into the habit of being impatient.Rushing through art to get a good quantity of stuff in your portfolio is an easy trap to fall into, but having patience and perseverance pays off in the long run.Working in the industry, I would say, don’t be complacent. It’s easy to stop creating your own art once you get a job at a games studio, but you’re never truly doing your own stuff, and that is the thing I love doing the most. So keep cracking on with creating your own art!

What is your advice for those considering entering the industry?

First piece of advice, and the most crucial is, decide what role it is that you want to do. Whether it's Character artist, or Environment artist, make sure it's one that you enjoy the most.If you know what you want to do, and you have artists that you aspire to, then look up their work. Look at their portfolios. Your goal is to either match, or exceed that. Standing out is key if you want to go far in the industry and if you can produce work as good as the veterans, you will have no problems finding a job.Networking is very important these days. Join sites like polycount and zbrushcentral. Join facebook groups like Ten Thousand hours. Post work, as for feedback.Finally - never fear criticism. You should be seeking constructive criticism and feedback, because no matter how good your work is, there's always room for improvement. And being able to recognise where you can improve is, in my opinion, the most important skill to have.

  

I can say that I managed to learn more in the first 2 weeks of the course than my entire 3 years doing a "Games course" at Uni. That's because the course was extremely focused and everything taught was incredibly relevant to what a student might want out of a games art course.

Adam Esat, Escapee