Holly Pickering

What course did you study?

Game Art Production (12 weeks)

What’s your favourite game and why?

Monkey Island from Lucas Arts, it was the first game I ever played and started my love of games as a medium. But in terms of more recent stuff I would say XCOM: Enemy Unknown.

What are you working on at the moment?

At the moment I'm working on an announced first person adventure game as an Art Director and Narrative Designer at A Brave Plan. Though I truth I do most jobs except for code. I'm also making my own personal game called SALT:A Social Story which is a narrative game set on a social network. This is showing at Rezzed Expo 2015 in London as part of the "Friends of Devolver" stand . Outside of this I also run a meetup and showcase event called LadyCADE which is all about celebrating the work of women in games. Also giving them a chance to meetup and socialise!

Holly Pickering's Success Story

If you had to sum up your time at Escape Studios in one word what would it be and why?

Is "inspiring" too cheesy? Simon Fenton (my tutor) was a really inspiring guy and really helped build my confidence. I was doubtful of my ability as an artist when I first arrived at Escape and through the progression of the course my confidence (and skill) grew massively.

How did studying at Escape Studios help you into the world of games?

I learnt the basics of everything I know 3D-wise (along with some fundamental art basics too) from my time at Escape. I didn't go to university so Escape is my only type of formal training I have received.

It would be safe to say that I wouldn't be where I am today without Escape. Not to mention I got put forward for my first games job by a fellow Escapee who had been on the same course as me!

Holly Pickering's Success Story

What lessons have you learnt during your time studying and your time working in games?

Ask for help. Probably the most important lesson I've ever learnt in my professional life. If you aren't sure on something or just want a second pair of eyes on your work, just ask. If your ego gets in the way and struggle along on your own, it ultimately hurts you further down the line.The other lesson is no one is born with talent. To get good at something takes a lot of hard work. There are no tools or magic fixes when it comes to art, so if your work sucks now, it will only improve if you are willing to give it the time it takes to get better. It won't happen on it's own!

What is your advice for those considering entering the industry?

Games is an industry (like most creative industries) where you really have to love what you do. You don't have to enjoy it all, I don't like UV mapping for example. But the love of creating games gets me through those bits. So if you aren't a bit obsessed with game development and wanting to improve as an artist; you will probably find this job isn't for you. I would also say to people to just get stuck in and try for themselves, since it's only through trying different parts of the development process that you find what you really enjoy doing within it.  

Holly Pickering's Success Story


   

Simon Fenton (my tutor) was a really inspiring guy and really helped build my confidence. I was doubtful of my ability as an artist when I first arrived at Escape and through the progression of the course my confidence (and skill) grew massively.

Holly Pickering, Escapee